Important:

This article is for information purposes only.

Please remember that financial investments may rise or fall and past performance does not guarantee future performance in respect of income or capital growth; you may not get back the amount you invested.

There is no obligation to purchase anything but, if you decide to do so, you are strongly advised to consult a professional adviser before making any investment decisions.

Mortgage choice widens, shows Moneyfacts data

Mortgage

Although 10 per cent deposit deals have come back to the market, the options for those with a smaller deposit has fallen

The number of mortgage products on the market increased for the second month in a row to 2,782, the largest monthly rise recorded since November 2014, data from Moneyfacts has shown.

Compared to the previous month, there were 378 more deals on the market.

This included the return of high loan to value (LTV) mortgages, as the number of 85 per cent LTV products rose from 344 to 396 and 90 per cent LTV deals increased to 88 from 56.

This was the highest number of deals seen across these tiers since March and June respectively.

Although some lenders have come back into the market with deals for those with a 10 per cent deposit, the options for those with a smaller deposit of five per cent has fallen. Moneyfacts recorded eight mortgages at 95 per cent LTV in December, down from 12 last month.

Overall, product availability is still 44 per cent down on the 4,966 that were on the market this time last year, and significantly lower than the 5,222 mortgages on the market in March.

Eleanor Williams, spokesperson at Moneyfacts, said: Echoing last month’s trend, the number of available mortgage deals has continued on an upwards trajectory, with a further 378 deals on offer now compared to November, the largest month-on-month increase in availability since November 2014.

This growth may be a reflection of lenders reacting to not only the level of pent-up demand from those looking to move following the first lockdown, but also the flood of would-be borrowers hoping to complete their new mortgage in time to benefit from the temporary stamp duty land tax holiday, Williams said.

The average rate of two-year fixes has also gone up, with the return of high LTV deals bringing the average to its highest point in five years.

At 85 per cent and 90 per cent LTV, rates increased on a monthly basis by 0.05 per cent and 0.03 per cent to 3.17 per cent and 3.79 per cent respectively.

According to Moneyfacts, these were the highest rates recorded since January 2015 and February 2015 respectively.

Across all LTVs, the average rate for a two-year fixed stood at 2.49 per cent, a monthly rise of 0.06 per cent and an annual increase of 0.05 per cent.

Borrowers who want to fix for a slightly longer period will be better off than they were previously, as the current average rate for these mortgages across all LTV tiers declined 0.01 per cent to 2.69 per cent since November and dropped 0.05 per cent annually.

However, the difference between the average two-year fixed and five-year fixed rate shrunk to 0.2 per cent in December, the smallest gap since June 2013 when it was 0.17 per cent.

Important:

This article is for information purposes only.

Please remember that financial investments may rise or fall and past performance does not guarantee future performance in respect of income or capital growth; you may not get back the amount you invested.

There is no obligation to purchase anything but, if you decide to do so, you are strongly advised to consult a professional adviser before making any investment decisions.