Important:

This article is for information purposes only.

Please remember that financial investments may rise or fall and past performance does not guarantee future performance in respect of income or capital growth; you may not get back the amount you invested.

There is no obligation to purchase anything but, if you decide to do so, you are strongly advised to consult a professional adviser before making any investment decisions.

House prices in Scotland rise 3.1 per cent

House prices Scotland

According to the data from Walker Fraser Steele, last year’s annual house price growth is the strongest since March 2015

House prices in Scotland increased 3.1 per cent in the month to December, taking the average home price for a home to over £200,000 for the first time.

The average price of a Scottish property reached £202,170 in December, topping a year that saw prices increase 8.5 per cent in 2020, according to the House Price Index figures from Walker Fraser Steele, part of e.surv surveyors.

Last year’s annual house price growth is the strongest since March 2015, according to the data, which was previously known as the Your Move Acadata House Price Index.

The market has partly been spurred by Scottish finance secretary Kate Forbes who lifted the level of the land and buildings transaction tax from £145,000 to £250,000 last July.

Forbes said eight out of 10 house sales in Scotland would be exempt from the tax, which is due to return to pre-pandemic levels on 1 April.

The move in Scotland came as chancellor Rishi Sunak suspended stamp duty for English homebuyers to stimulate a collapsed market.

Acadata senior housing analyst John Tindale says: Monthly transactions have more than doubled since the introduction of the LBTT holiday in July, although part of this increase is to do with seasonal factors.

Walker Fraser Steele business development manager Alan Penman adds: The Scottish housing market passed a notable milestone at the end of 2020, as the average property price rose above £200,000 for the first time ever. This new record follows a year of extraordinary growth in the Scottish market – the average price increased by over 8 per cent during the last year and 11 per cent over the last two years.

The increase in the threshold for the LBTT played a key role in stimulating the market over 2020, he says.

Penman says: It’s also worth noting that the economic effects of Coronavirus have not been felt equally and while many Scottish households have struggled financially, some have been able to use the pandemic to bolster their savings. Working from home while cutting out the costs of commuting and socialising has provided an unexpected opportunity for some to save towards a deposit for a property.

Important:

This article is for information purposes only.

Please remember that financial investments may rise or fall and past performance does not guarantee future performance in respect of income or capital growth; you may not get back the amount you invested.

There is no obligation to purchase anything but, if you decide to do so, you are strongly advised to consult a professional adviser before making any investment decisions.