Important:

This article is for information purposes only.

Please remember that financial investments may rise or fall and past performance does not guarantee future performance in respect of income or capital growth; you may not get back the amount you invested.

There is no obligation to purchase anything but, if you decide to do so, you are strongly advised to consult a professional adviser before making any investment decisions.

First time buyer deposits soared in the past decade

First time buyer

Finance management platform Stipendum says the average cost of a mortgage deposit on a first home has climbed by 54 per cent in the last decade

A new analysis of prospective first time buyers suggests that the cost of their initial deposit has soared in the past decade – suggesting demand for rental property will stay strong.

Finance management platform Stipendum says the average cost of a mortgage deposit on a first home has climbed by 54 per cent in the last decade, pushing homeownership further out of reach for the nation’s first-time buyers.

Stipendium analysed the current cost facing first-time buyers when it comes to a mortgage deposit and how this has changed over the last five and 10 years.

The research shows that a decade ago, the average first-time buyer was required to place a deposit of 17 per cent in order to secure their first home. With the average first-time buyer house price at the time sitting at £138,973 ($181,078.34), this equated to a deposit of £23,625 – £29,684 ($30,782.78 – $38,677.51) once adjusted for inflation.

Fast forward five years and the level of deposit required from the average FTB had fallen, albeit marginally, to 16 per cent. However, with the average first home costing £181,440 ($236,411.78), the nation’s FTBs were looking at a mortgage deposit to the tune of £29,030 – £32,495 ($37,825.36 – $42,340.17) once adjusting for inflation.

This means that the initial financial hurdle of securing a first home climbed by nine per cent in five years, an increase of just £2,811 ($3,662.66).

Today, however, Britain’s booming housing market has pushed this cost far higher.

The average first-time buyer is now required to place a deposit of 20 per cent and with the average first home coming in at £227,846 ($296,877.64), this equates to a sizeable £45,569 ($59,375.27).

That’s a 40 per cent increase in the last five years alone and a 54% increase in the last decade even after adjusting for inflation.

Christina Melling, chief executive of Stipendium, comments: Record house price growth means that the initial requirement of a mortgage deposit has climbed substantially over the last decade and the vast majority of this increase has been seen in the last five years alone.

She says: While this increase will have been felt by homebuyers at all levels of the market, it’s been particularly hard on first-time buyers who are just starting out on their journey to homeownership and who won’t have the financial backing of a previous property in order to cover their mortgage deposit costs.

Important:

This article is for information purposes only.

Please remember that financial investments may rise or fall and past performance does not guarantee future performance in respect of income or capital growth; you may not get back the amount you invested.

There is no obligation to purchase anything but, if you decide to do so, you are strongly advised to consult a professional adviser before making any investment decisions.